Full House Residence Purchased by Show's Creator

Back in June, we wrote a blog about the sale of the property at 1709 Broderick Street, better known as the Tanner residence on the popular television show, Full House. The show was about a widower whose brother and best friend move into his San Francisco home to help raise his three daughters. Just like the Mrs. Doubtfire house, this residence is one of the city's most renown, and it's recent sale was big news across the country. 

At the time of the home's closing, details on the new owner were unknown but it has recently been discovered that the show's creator, Jeff Franklin, purchased the house with plans to restore it and open it to the public.

Franklin paid over $4 million for the Lower Pacific Heights Victorian home.

Says Franklin, "The house came on the market and really, I just thought, I have to buy this house," Franklin told The Hollywood Reporter. "I'm so sentimental about the house. It's great to have the house in our "Full House" family and be able to preserve it for the fans. […] Seriously, I love owning this house."

 The facade of 1709 Broderick Street was used in the TV show, Full House.

The facade of 1709 Broderick Street was used in the TV show, Full House.

Franklin's plans for the property include giving it a Full House renovation to make it feel as though the show's original Tanner family actually lives there. He also claims that he wants to shoot a third season of the show' spinoff, Fuller House, inside the residence. Even the original Full House was never filmed at 1709 Broderick Street.

September 2017 marks the 30th anniversary of Full House and Franklin plans to host a "big slumber party" with the show's cast, inviting fans to drive by and see them inside.

 The cast of the original Full House, which aired from 1987 to 1995. Bob Sagat, John Stamos and Dave Coulier were the three main male characters.

The cast of the original Full House, which aired from 1987 to 1995. Bob Sagat, John Stamos and Dave Coulier were the three main male characters.

And last but not least, he intends to open the house to the public, at least for a period of time. "It's a shame to let it sit empty," he says. "I will be renting it out but I'm not sure yet what, where, when or how. At some point soon I will figure that out."